V-Strom 650 || Modifications || Converting turn signals into Running lights

My Honda ST1100 had beautiful 3-wire turn signals (1157 socket) which meant that the turn signals could function as both ‘running lights’ and as ‘turn signals’.

This might not seem like a big deal, but on a 2-wheeler where you want to be seen as much as possible, having those running lights can be a huge visibility boost. My V-Strom unfortunately has a 2-wire (1156 socket) system meaning turn signals only blink when I activate the turn signal, and stays turned off at all other times…. this bothered me a lot.

The beautiful final result! (I’ve also added LED light strips on the handguards)

This 1980 detailed article shows that having headlights (a proxy for lighting/visibility) OFF increased the chance of an accident by more than a factor of 2 ! Also, the oncoming automobile driver ‘not seeing’ the motorcycle is the biggest reason for accidents. Visibility is hugely important! Think about that….a simple lighting improvement reduces accident likelihood by more than 50%.. (page 387 in this document) 

To come back to the my V-Strom, I decided to modify the stock wiring to use the Custom Dynamics turn signal module to convert my turn signals into turn + running lights.

You need the Custom Dynamics blinker module, $30 shipped. You get two modules for the $30

Custom Dynamics blinker module from eBay ($30)

I also bought a set of posi tap & posi lock connections to help me with tapping into stock wiring with minimal splice / cutting / soldering.

The module, and a set of posi tap & posi lock connectors

On the V-Strom, the left and right turn bulbs each have two wires. You can visually inspect them by looking into the front fairing, to the sides of the headlights.

Right side – Green wire (blinker) and B/W (ground)

Right turn wires & connector

Left side – Solid black wire (blinker) and B/W (ground)

Left turn wire & connector

The writing is pretty straightforward with the posi tap products. You can disconnect the connections between each turn wire (see the marked picture) and then use one blinker set for each side.

Wiring information for blinker module:-

 

Once the wiring is correctly done, just test it out to make sure things are working correctly. Once this final check is done, you can now go ahead and safely tuck away the wiring neatly with zip ties inside the fairing. MAKE SURE YOU CAN TURN HANDLEBARS WITHOUT DAMAGING WIRING !

🙂 🙂

Hope this helps anyone trying to get running and turn lights on their motorcycle. This works for any motorcycle with the two wire situation.

Turn signals converted into Running lights!
Turn signals converted into Running lights!

 

 

 

Regards,
Vishnu
thepaleobiker

V-Strom 650 || Modifications || Reducing Buffeting Part 2 – Rick’s Mirror Extenders

I finally got around to installing Ricks Mirror extenders from www.adventuretech.biz

Continuing on from my earlier article on the Windshield replacement, I look forward to seeing how much the dirty wind around my helmet has reduced. It had already reduced significantly thanks to the Givi – I can now listen to my favorite podcasts (On Point – Tom Ashbrook by NPR) on my Sena headset, which I could not do before while on the Stock windshield….

Removing the stock mirror – you actually don’t need to separate the two pieces like I did – Learn from my missteps ! 🙂

The removed stock rear view mirror, and it’s parts (I wrongly separated the stalk from the lowest screw nut)

Rick’s extenders come with a nice spacer that sits atop the stock female thread on the handlebar

You need to place the new black spacer on top of this female thread, and use Rick’s extended long bolt.

You simply put the space over the female thread, use Rick’s long bolt to secure the extended piece ; You need to use an 8MM Allen key to tighten up the bolt.

The new, installed mirror extender! Super sexy & looks stock 🙂 . You just need to install back the mirror stalk onto this extender. Use blue loctite if needed

That’s it! Now you can screw back in the stock mirror stalk into the female thread on Rick’s extender. Done ! The improved visibility is nothing short of amazing.

Additional Pics to follow :-

Improved rear visibility! Vastly better. I no longer see just my shoulders 😀

Regards,
Vishnu
‘thepaleobiker’

V-Strom 650 || Modifications || Reducing Buffeting Part 1 – Givi D260ST Tall windshield

The majority of Strom owners have experienced ‘buffeting’ on their rides, especially at speeds greater than 50 MPH. There have been numerous theories as to how/why this happens, but the common wisdom & consensus revolves around the following main reasons :-

1) Stock Windshield & mounting bracket locations cause ‘dirty’ turbulent air to flow up to the rider’s helmet causing a majority of the buffeting effect (potentially resolved using aftermarket brackets such as MadStad & aftermarket windshields)

2) Stock mirror stems are aerodynamically in a bad spot, and these add to the turbulence felt at the helmet (resolved by using different mirrors such as Aprilla Mirrors, or by using a simple genius mirror extender such as Rick’s Extenders)

When I got the bike, it already had the excellent MadStad Brackets on them. These help provide different adjustments to the windshield, and helps the rider find a good sweet spot tailored to their riding style, their torso/seat height etc. I had a horrid time on the freeway with the stock windshield 🙁 so I decided to get a taller touring one installed.

While researching potential windshield replacements, I decided on the Givi D260ST in particular for its excellent price ($119 shipped from Revzilla) and also because I did not need an adjustable windshield like the AirFlow ‘AF’ windshields given I already had my MadStad.

The Givi D260ST Tall windshield is 7″ higher than stock and rather wider too. I took some pictures that might help you get a sense for how much taller/wider this is compared to the stock.

Results – Part 1

1) So far, the buffeting/wind turbulence around my helment has already reduced significantly thanks to the Givi – I can now listen to my favorite podcasts (On Point – Tom Ashbrook by NPR) on my Sena headset, which I could not do before while on the Stock windshield….

2) The Givi had to be slightly coerced into attaching on the Madstad (fits tightly), nothing that should be concerning. Just a good tight fit!

The below pictures are self explanatory, and should be helpful to anyone looking to get this cheap simple windshield alternative.

Stock vs Givi D260ST – 1

Stock vs Givi

Stock vs Givi D260ST – 2

Side view comparison

Givi on MadStad Lowest & Straight Up

 

Givi on MadStad Lowest & Pulled Back all the way

 

Givi on MadStad Highest & Straight Up

Givi on MadStad Highest & Pulled Back all the way

 

 

 

 

Hope this helps you and your v strom! 🙂

Regards,
Vishnu
‘thepaleobiker’

V-Strom 650|| Modifications || Replacing Stock Tail/Brake light bulbs with LED bulbs (video comparison)

Hi all,

I bought LED 1157 bulbs to replace the stock tail light bulbs. My intent was two fold : reduced power consumption, and higher light output.

I’ve found JDM A star to be a fantastic company and a reliable supplier of high quality LED products – I’ve used their LED bulbs for 3 years now, first starting with my Honda ST1100 and now on the Wee Strom.

JDM ASTAR Super Bright 5730 Chipsets 1157 2057 2357 7528 LED Bulbs with Projector,Brilliant Red

 

JDM A star Super bright LED bulbs Red 1157

 

 

The install is pretty simple. Take off the seat, reach back into the rear section of the tail light housing area (you’ve to reach back past where the tool kit is placed)

Each bulb is held on a plastic holder that needs to be turned counter clockwise to “unscrew” it from its base.

Once it’s unscrewed from the base, you can simply replace the bulb with the LED one. Its the 1157 Socket which is a direct replacement.

I took a video to compare the output, and there’s no comparison! The LED is way brighter on the running light, and the video truly doesnt do justice to the brightness of these LEDs.

Hope this helps anyone trying to upgrade lighting and save a few watts in the process 🙂 . Ride Safe!

Regards,
Vishnu